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Articles tagged with "books"

Unpaid paid recommendations

In today's weekend posting, two recommendations about things that are not free (which is a first) and a rant (which is very much in brand for this blog).

Drawing faces with JLJ

On a previous blog entry I complained that it's very difficult to find a good drawing tutorial because many, many teachers will suggest something as useless as "do whatever comes natural". So imagine my surprise when I found a course on drawing faces that makes none of those mistakes.

The course in question is titled "How to draw a portrait" and is taught by an illustrator from Florida called Joshua L Johnson. The course guides you through the steps of framing your drawing, identifying the main features, refining the details and, finally, adding shadows. The course can be found on Skillshare following this link.

I like this course for a couple reasons. First, each step is actionable: when he wants you to draw an eye, he explains that a generic eye is composed of 7 segments and explains where to place each one. Second, the workflow itself is designed in a smart way, first delimiting "areas" of work and then refining them step by step. The course ends with a 40 minutes, real-time lesson on how to draw a specific face from beginning to end which I found really helpful. So if your faces are as bad as mine, you should consider taking a look.

Solutions and other problems

It is hard for me to express to you how ridiculously funny Allie Brosh is. Her blog Hyperbole and a half is the only website I can remember where I had to stop reading for minutes at a time because I couldn't stop laughing. Some of the most well-known entries are probably This is why I'll never be an adult which gave rise to the "all the things" meme, and the creation of the Alot. Unsurprisingly, her first book collecting some of these stories ended up being a New York Times best-seller.

Perhaps more well-known are her two posts on depression (part 1, part 2) where she manages to put in words the feelings of thousands of people. I have seen an actual therapist recommend these posts to people, and the almost 10K collective comments in those entries alone seem to agree.

And the reason I am bringing up these two sides of her blog is because I recently read her second book, and let me tell you, it is a roller coaster: it is funny, it is sad, and sometimes it's both at the same time. It is the best thing I read all year, and I think everyone should do the same. To say that I recommend it would be an understatement. It would be more accurate for you to imagine me grabbing you by your clothes while yelling "READ THIS BOOK".

Disclaim all of the things

I didn't want to leave this post as it is without complaining about how difficult it is to make an honest recommendation on the internet.

I have a subscription to Skillshare because I like the quality of their courses, but I am really, really annoyed at their marketing showing up everywhere. With so many youtubers doing paid promotions for courses they don't care about, I feel slightly dirty making a recommendation just like them, even if no one is paying me for doing it. I thought for a second about pointing you to a free mirror, but that would be unfair to the course's creator.

Similarly, someone on Allie Brosh's publishing team had the brilliant idea of creating fake Reddit accounts and using them to market the book. People like them make it impossible for me to recommend almost anything in good conscience. I have decided to make an exception for this specific book, but I don't see that happening again anytime soon.